NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements: How Proficient are your Students?

My slideshare in which I describe what the NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements are, their benefits and suggestions for use based on my classroom use of them.

http://www.slideshare.net/hgtuttle/ncssflactfl-can-do-how-proficiency-are-your-students

My two ebooks,Modern Language Proficiency: Can-Do Strategies and  90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activitiesare available at http://bit.ly/tsmash

At http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle, there are four modern language culture inquiry activities and one Spanish culture inquiry activity. Also, at the same site,  I have 30+ activities (about 24 for Spanish and 6 for all Modern Language) to develop student speaking through highly structured or scaffolded, speaking. Students work in pairs.

My Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment and a general Formative Assessment book are available at http://www.routledge.com/books/search/author/harry_grover_tuttle/

 

Beginning of Year Modern Language Review for Upper Levels

Many modern language teachers start off the school year with a review for their Level 2, 3, 4 and 5 students . Usually, these teachers have the students review grammar or vocabulary. Often, the  teachers focus on the subgoal of learning vocabulary and grammar but not on the big goal of improving oral communication;  the teachers can begin the year with a review of oral communication. ACTFL Proficiencies and, particularly, the Can-Do Proficiency Statements focus on communication, not discrete grammar or vocabulary.   For example, modern language teachers can have their students work in pairs. One student in the group asks a common topic from a communication card. such as home, school, leisure time activities, food, etc. The partner answers the question and the asking student verifies that the answer is close to the written most likely answer.  When the teacher has the students review the communication cards, the students are also reviewing vocabulary and grammar but they are reviewing vocabulary and grammar in context of meaningful communication.

Another activity involves the students looking at a picture for a common topic such as home, school, leisure time activities, food, etc . The students either ask questions about the picture that their partners answer or they  role play two people in the picture.

In addition, as students who are involved in the communication activities mark down how many sentences their partner says or asks and their partners write the same thing for them. In this way the students are also reviewing their fluency to see if they’re at the same high level of fluency that they were at the end of the last year. They set their base line for improvement for this year.

Students want to find out about each other and they like to ask questions about interesting target language pictures; such communication activities allow them to do that. Students like to compete against their own fluency scores.  Students often become bored by doing  isolated non-contextual grammar or vocabulary review activities.

At http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle, I have 30+ activities (about 24 for Spanish and 6 for all Modern Language) to develop student speaking through highly structured or scaffolded, speaking. Students work in pairs.  Also, there are four modern language culture inquiry activities and one Spanish culture inquiry activity at  the same location.

Two ebooks, 90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities and Modern Language Proficiency: Can-Do Strategies, are available at http://bit.ly/tsmash

My Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment and a general Formative Assessment book are available at http://www.routledge.com/books/search/author/harry_grover_tuttle/

 

Modern Language Culture -Like it

Many modern language teachers love to return to the target language country. They enjoy the food. They delight in walking the streets to soak up the culture.  Notice the verbs in the previous three statements. They are not factual verbs but they are emotionally positive verbs.

Modern language teachers want their students to like the target language country. However, often the teachers’ presentations do not contribute to a positive feeling about the target language country. When students learn the factual culture such as the country’s name, its location, its flag, its unit of money, its geography, and the famous places in the country these facts do not help the students feel positively about the culture.

Modern language teachers can connect their students to real people from the culture. These teachers go beyond having their students read about the people in their textbook. They have their student talk with a native speaker about common themes such as weekends, sports, food, clothing, housing. They can have a native speaker physically come in the class or they can use a program like Skype to virutally bring a person in. Teachers may show a picture of a person and then have that person phone in.

A native speaker helps students to move from learning  facts about a country to actually meeting someone from the country. Students begin to like that country.

How do you help your students like the modern language culture?

At http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle there are four modern language culture inquiry activities and one Spanish culture inquiry activity. At the same location, I have 30+ activities (about 24 for Spanish and 6 for all Modern Language) to develop student speaking

My Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment and a general Formative Assessment book are available at http://www.routledge.com/books/search/author/harry_grover_tuttle/

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities and Modern Language Proficiciency: Can-Do Strategies ebooks are available at http://bit.ly/tsmash

 

 

Modern Language Formative Assessment or Just Raw Data

The term “formative assessment” is used very frequently in discussing modern language learning. Teachers often cite many different ways of doing formative assessment:  thumbs up or down; five fingers;   A, B, C, D cards;  clickers;  online surveys;  red  yellow green cards;  exit slips;  3-2-1 cards; etc.

Each of these techniques collects raw data. If the activity ends with the raw data, then no formative assessment has been done. Formative assessment implies that the raw data (monitoring), will go to diagnosis, to feedback, and to student implementation of the feedback to overcoming the gap. (Tuttle,Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students 2009.)

In diagnosis, the modern language teacher decides if there is a gap between the intended learning and the actual student learning. If there is a gap, then the teacher does a diagnosis to determine what specific different strategy the student can use to overcome the gap within this class or a few classes. In feedback the teacher invites the student to use the new different strategy. It is highly unlikely that if the original learning strategy or approach did not work, redoing the same strategy or doing more of it will result in success (“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” – attributed to Einstein). The modern language teacher builds in classroom time for the student to practice the new strategy; the student may need several classes. The formative assessment has worked when the student has overcome the language gap and can successfully demonstrate the learning. If the student has not demonstrated the learning after several tries then the student may need another different strategy.

What does formative assessment look like in the modern language classroom? An example from my book: Improving Foreign Language Speaking Through Formative Assessment will illustrate peer formative assessment.  Student A describes a visual for a minute. Student B records a slash for each said statement. At the end of the minute, Student B tells Student A how many sentences he/she said.  Students know that their goal is eight sentences in a minute. If Student A has not said eight sentences, Students B indicates topics or items in the visual that Student A could have talked about.  Student A then creates sentences for those items.Student A and B  may practice several times that class and even during the next class so that they can say eight different things about the visual in a minute.

In another example from my online speaking activities,  Student A asks Student B the question from a printed card.  Student B supplies an answer.  Student A compares that answer to the written answer which contains the most likely response or  responses. If Student B’s answer does not match, then Student A coaches Student B by giving hints about the answer; Student A does not just give him/her the answer. Once Student B gets the answer, Student A asks the question again so Student B can answer it correctly.

Do you do formative assessment or do you collect raw data?

I have 30+ activities (about 24 for Spanish and 6 for all Modern Language) to develop student speaking at http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle. At the same location there are four modern language culture inquiry activities and one Spanish culture inquiry activity.

The formative assessment books are available at http://www.routledge.com/books/search/author/harry_grover_tuttle/

The following ebooks are available at http://bit.ly/tsmash

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

 

 

Modern Language Proficiencies: Can-Do Strategies

 

Modern Language Mobile Activities for Pair or Small Groups

Many modern language teachers do not use mobile learning in their class because they worry that not every student has a mobile device. However, the modern language classroom is a cooperative environment. As long as at least half of the students have a mobile device (and they do according to Pew 2012),  then students can work in pairs. Even if only a third of the students have mobile devices, then students can work in small groups of three.

For example, in pairs or triads, the modern language student who has a mobile device finds a picture of a family member or friend on the mobile device. The other people in his/her group ask questions in the target language about the person in the photo.  When the partner has a turn, that partner looks at a different picture of a person and tells information about the person.The person with the photo confirms or negates the information.

In pairs or traids, world language students can take a series of five pictures that tell a story by using one student’s mobile device.Then, they combine with another group. The other group narrates the first group’s story and the first group adds any other information to the story. Then they switch roles.

Additionally, in their pair or triad, they look at an Internet image search of a city or town in the target language area.They say a sentence in the target language for the first fifteen different pictures. Each sentence proves unique information. Beginning students can say basic sentences  such as “It is tall.”

How do you use mobile devices in your class to promote student speaking?

I have 30+ activities (about 24 for Spanish and 6 for all Modern Language) to develop student speaking at http://bit.ly/tpthtuttle.
The following ebooks are available at http://bit.ly/tsmash

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

 

 

Modern Language Proficiencies: Can-Do Strategies

Modern Language Proficiencies: Can-Do Strategies

Reflection on Students’ Modern Language Success Using Can-Do Statements

Although I try to reflect during the semester/ year on what I can do to improve my students’ modern language  success, I find that the end of the semester/year allows me a bigger picture of their success. This semester I gave  the NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements to my college beginning Spanish students at the start of the semester. I used a reformatted form which had the Novice Level on one side and the Intermediate on the other. Students checked off what they felt they could do.

During the course, I extended the textbook material  to cover the Can-Do Statements. I modified the tests to include more assessment of these Statements. I gave them the NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements at mid-point for their self-assessment.  Many students, especially students who had never taken a language before, were amazed at their progress. They realized that they still had much to learn before they could function in many world situations.

At the end of the semester, I gave out the Can-Do Statements for self-assessment again.  I asked the students to comment on their ending results. All students had mastered at least 85% of the Novice level. They could not do the statements that requirement different tenses since we only cover the present tense in beginning Spanish.  Many could do numerous statements on the Intermediate Level. They were very aware of their language growth in the course. I gave a supplementary speaking final to assess how well their self-assessment was realistic. 95% of the students exceeded my expectations.

The Can-Do Statements provide built-in reflection as to the students’ progress. I have a plan for how to help the students do an even better job of meeting the very real-world Can-Do  Statements. The following ebooks are available at  http://bit.ly/tsmash

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

90 Mobile Learning Modern Language Activities by Harry Grover Tuttle

Modern Language Proficiencies: Can-Do Strategies

Modern Language Proficiencies: Can-Do Strategies

Modern Language Proficiency: Can-Do Strategies ebook

Modern Language Proficiency: Can-Do StrategiesModern Language Proficiency: Can-Do Strategies by Dr. Harry Grover Tuttle provides teachers with many practical classroom strategies so their students can achieve the NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do proficiencies of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Half of the 74 readings focuses on improving students’ speaking, the least developed skill in the classroom. Also, the ebook explains how grammar, vocabulary, culture, the textbook and mobile devices help develop proficiency. It contains many mini-assessments. As students do these strategy activities, they climb up the proficiency levels.The ebook contains 40,220 words (the equivalent of a 148 double spaced page book). $9.99   Can be purchased at  http://bit.ly/tsmash

Table of contents:
(Subsection names have been abbreviated.)

Introduction
Proficiency and Can-Do Overview
…….Quotations. Proficiency as Goal. NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements. Can-Do for Curriculum.

Interpersonal Speaking
Importance
……..Students’ Definitions. Survival Proficient Speaking. Emotional Conversations. More Speaking. Input or Output.
ACTFL Quality And Quantity
……..90% Modification. Paragraph Length Speaking. 20 Sentences Daily. 8 Minutes of Daily Speaking.
Speaking Decisions
……..Speaking Practice. Grammar to Communication Focus. Mechanical to Spontaneous.
…Modern Language Methods-Practical Ideas
……..Consistency in Learning. Movement. Intensity of Learning. Increased Verbal Interaction. Student Participation Increase. More Frequent Participation. Grammar Transformation to Spontaneous Speaking. Technology Guidelines.
...Strategies for Developing Spontaneous Speaking
……..Flexible Sentences. “Find Someone Who” Variations. Scaffolding Through Questions and Answers. Speaking Mats. Visual Context. Extension of Speaking. Verb Variety Increase. Role Play. Paired Speaking.
...Oral Assessment
……..Formative Assessment. Daily Speaking Assessment Sheets. Pre- and Post-Assessment. Proficiency Coupons. Proficiency Certificates. Timed Oral Fluency. Speaking on the Final. Grades and Proficiency. Student Learning Object (SLO). Institutional Assessment. Advocacy Through Proficiency.

Listening
……..Yes/No. Interactive Listening. Information Listening. Actions. Cultural Listening.

Reading
……..Sequencing Slips. True/False. Reading Recall. Reading Comprehension in the Modern Language. Comprehension Techniques. Difficult Comprehension. Purposeful Reading. Graphic Organizers. Authentic Text.

Writing
……..Writing Structure. Question Answering. Writing Expansion. Purposeful Writing with Prompts. Visual Story. Online Collective Story.

Culture
……..Promote Positive Feelings. Critical Culture. Culture as Prompts. Mobile Integration.

Vocabulary
……..Personally Useful. Critical Conversational Vocabulary. 10 Second Vocabulary Learning.  Visual-Based. Long Vocabulary List.

Grammar
……..Grammar as Vocabulary. Color Coding. Gestures. Flashcards. Memory Devices. Contrast. Common Forms. PACE Method.

Textbook
……..Tool. Students’ Textbook Dependency. Differences in Textbooks over Years. Beyond the Physical Textbook. QR Code Textbook.

Mobile Devices
……..Categories. App to Speaking. Communication Activities.

Spontaneous Speaking Language Activities
……..Activities for All Languages. Speaking Mats. Role Play. Speed Dating/Interviewing. In-depth Speed Dating/Interviewing. Find Someone Who. Spontaneous Speaking. Grammar to Spontaneous Speaking

Conclusion

Reference

About the Author

Acknowledgments